Development environment

Internal Displacement Update
Issue 16: 20 April - 3 May 2017

Issue 16 map
Feature

Central African Republic

Affected areas

Basse Kotto, Haute-Kotto, Mbomou and Ouaka prefectures

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

More than 33,000 new displacements between 1 February and 30 April; about 24,000 returns in March

Context

Between 2,000 and 2,500 people were displaced between February and April from Mbomou prefecture (after confrontations in Bakouma and Nzako towns in March), Ouaka, and Haute-Kotto to Alindao town in Basse Kotto prefecture. Of this group, about 350 mainly Fula people from Mboumou were staying in the offices of AFAPS (Association des Femmes d'Alaindao pour la Lutte contre la Pauvreté et le Sida), a non-governmental organisation. Others stayed with host families (OCHA, 30 April 2017).

Basse Kotto prefecture

More than 14,000 people were displaced from Mingala town in Basse Kotto prefecture between 1 March and 30 April because of confrontations between armed groups. This is more than half of the population of Mingala. They fled within the prefecture and to Haute-Kotto, Ouaka and Mbomou prefectures (OCHA, 30 April 2017).

Another 316 people displaced from Kollo in Basse Kotto at an unspecified time were in Ndana as of 30 April (OCHA, 30 April 2017).

Mbomou prefecture

About 100 Fula people, mainly women and children, fled into the bush after being ambushed by a group presumed to be anti-balaka in Fodé town in Mbomou on 11 April.

About 3,500 people fled into the bush after the attack of a group presumed to be the Union for Peace in the Central African Republic (l’Union pour la Paix en Centrafrique, UPC) on Dembia town in Mbomou on 14 April (OCHA, 16 April 2017).

Ouaka prefecture

About 9,800 people (75 per cent) of the population of Bakala town in Ouaka prefecture, which had been almost completely emptied between December 2015 and January 2016, returned between 1 February and 16 April (OCHA, 23 April 2017).

At least 11,000 people were displaced by fighting in Ouaka and sought shelter in Bambari town between 19 March and 16 April (OCHA, 16 April 2017).

About 1,500 people returned home from camps at Bambari between late March and 19 April (OCHA, 30 April 2017).

More than 2,300 people, which is more than half of the population of Boyo town in Ouaka, fled into the bush and towards Atongo Bakary, Bambari, Ippy and Maloum towns after confrontations between armed groups in Boyo on 31 March and 8 April. Only 1,000 people remained but people continued to flee (OCHA, 23 April 2017). 

About 87,000 IDPs were living in Ouaka prefecture as of 19 April, an increase of 6,000 in one month because of insecurity (OCHA, 30 April 2017).

Five to ten Arab households (20 to 40 people) were expelled from Sabegoudé, a village 108 km east of Kouango town in Ouaka at an unspecified time before 21 or 22 April after tensions arose between Arab and Fula communities (OCHA, 23 April 2017).

Country figures

More than 426,000 IDPs were living in the Central African Republic as of the end of March. This figure is 21,000 or five per cent higher than the figure for February. About 311,000 people stayed with host families and 115,000 were in camps. About 24,000 people returned home in March (CMP, 24 April 2017).

“Since late 2016, two factions of the predominantly Muslim Seleka armed group have clashed heavily in the volatile Ouaka province: the UPC, consisting mostly of ethnic Peuhl, and the Popular Front for the Renaissance in the Central African Republic (Front Populaire pour la Renaissance de la Centrafrique, FPRC), which has aligned itself with the anti-balaka – the main armed group once fighting the Seleka …

“The latest round of killings began in mid-February when anti-balaka fighters ambushed a group of civilians on a truck in the village of Ndoussoumba, killing at least 16 Peuhl civilians …

“Armed groups are targeting civilians for revenge killings in the central part of the country. As factions vie for power in the Central African Republic, civilians on all sides are exposed to their deadly attacks” (HRW, 2 May 2017).

East Asia and Pacific

Philippines

Affected areas

Bohol and Lanao del Sur provinces, Eastern Visayas region

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 26,000 new displacements between 11 April and 1 May

Context

About 22,000 people were displaced by armed conflict between the military, police and Islamist group Abu Sayyaf on 11 April in Inabangan municipality in Eastern Visayas region. About 4,500 people were still staying in 14 evacuation centres and 900 with family and friends as of 24 April (DROMIC, 24 April 2017).

About 3,400 people were displaced from Piagapo and Balindong municipalities in Lanao del Sur province by conflict between the armed forces and an unidentified armed group on 22 April. About 1,800 stayed in 10 evacuation centres and 1,600 with friends or family. They returned home by 1 May (DROMIC, 1 May 2017).

About 1,000 people were evacuated from six barangays because of a firefight between Abu Sayyaf and government troops in Clarin town in Bohol province on 22 April (NDRRMO, 23 April 2017).

Europe and Central Asia

Tajikistan

Affected areas

Asht, Darvoz, Laksh, Rasht and Roshtkala districts

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods and mud flows)

Figures

About 3,700 new displacements between 13 and 27 April

Context

About 3,700 people were displaced from Asht, Darvoz, Laksh, Roshtkala and Rasht districts between 13 and 27 April by floods and mud flows after heavy rain and warmer temperatures that melted glaciers (IFRC, 27 April 2017, on file with IDMC).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Dominican Republic

Affected areas

Most provinces

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

About 18,000 new displacements between 18 and 27 April

Context

About 18,000 people were displaced by floods after heavy rain that started on 18 April across most provinces of the Dominican Republic. About 350 displaced people were in shelters in San Cristobal, Barahona and Bahoruco provinces in the south of the country as of 27 April, while the rest were living with host families (Listin Diario, 27 April 2017). About 1,800 people were displaced by floods in northern regions of the county in March (Floodlist, 26 April 2017).

Peru

Affected areas

Ancash, La Libertad, Lambayeque, Lima and Piura departments

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

About 151,000 people displaced as of 26 April

Context

About 43,000 households (about 151,000 people) were displaced as of 26 April in many areas by floods that destroyed more than 21,000 houses and rendered at least 21,000 additional homes uninhabitable. About 31,000 people were staying in 205 shelters in eight departments as of 26 April. More than 95 per cent were concentrated in La Libertad, Lambayeque, Lima and Piura (OCHA, 27 April 2017).

Middle East and North Africa

Iraq

Affected areas

Mosul

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 442,000 new displacements between 17 October 2016 and 27 April 2017; 105,000 returns between 17 October 2016 and 27 April 2017; 83,000 returns across Iraq in March

Context

About 442,000 people (74,000 families) were displaced by the Mosul military operations that started on 17 October 2016. More than 336,000 were still displaced as of 27 April while more than 105,000 had returned to their areas of origin (UNHCR, 27 April 2017).

About 500,000 people in western Mosul city remain largely inaccessible to humanitarians, sheltering from the fighting or waiting for a chance to flee (OCHA, 19 April 2017).

About 83,000 people across Iraq returned in March. Anbar governorate had the highest rate of return; returnees outnumber IDPs by two to one. Many families continue to need humanitarian assistance after returning to their areas of origin (OCHA, 16 April 2017).

Lebanon

Affected areas

Bekaa valley

Cause of displacement

Conflict, mandatory evacuations and evictions

Figures

About 4,000 new displacements between 12 April and 1 May

Context

About 4,000 Syrian refugees left their shelters or tents in Bekaa valley between 12 April and 1 May after the Lebanese army told them at the end of March to leave their informal camp, near Rayak airbase. Up to 12,000 people could be forced to move in what could be the biggest mass eviction of its kind in Lebanon since the Syrian war began. About 330,000 Syrian refugees live in Bekaa valley, which borders their homeland. Some refugees have been evicted three times since fleeing Syria four years ago (VOA, 1 May 2017). The evacuation order in late March gave people seven to ten days to evacuate their camps. Although the deadline had passed, the army had yet to carry out any forced evictions. Refugees faced difficulty knowing where to move to. “If they move to a different area that is still within the eviction zone, they may face a secondary eviction in the future,” said Human Rights Watch (Human Rights Watch, 12 April 2017).

Syria

Affected areas

Hama, Idlib, Raqqa, Rural Damascus governorates

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 81,000 new displacements between 1 and 24 April; 125 evacuees killed on 15 April

Context

About 68,000 people were displaced, mostly from Hama and Raqqa governorates, between 1 and 17 April (UNHCR, 26 April 2017).

About 8,000 people were evacuated from the government-controlled towns of Foah and Kafraya to western Aleppo between 14 and 19 April, and 2,900 people from non-government controlled towns of Madaya and Zabadani to Idlib governorate. This was under the Four Towns agreement, brokered in September 2015 to allow aid delivery to and evacuation of people from four besieged towns in Rural Damascus and Idlib governorates.

At least 125 evacuees from Foah and Kafraya were killed, including at least 67 children, 13 women and 16 men, and 413 were wounded on 15 April when a car bomb exploded at the Rashideen waiting area where they were awaiting their transfer (OCHA, 20 April 2017).

Evacuations from the four towns were completed on 21 April (UNHCR, 26 April 2017).

About 600 people were evacuated from Waer, the last opposition-held neighbourhood in Homs, on 24 April. This was the sixth round of such evacuations (ECHO, 27 April 2017). These evacuations started in March and are based on a deal between non-government forces and the government, under which between 10,000 and 15,000 people would leave the neighbourhood in six to eight weeks. “Damascus has said such deals are a good way to bring the country closer to peace after six years of conflict. The opposition and rights groups, however, have called the agreements a tactic of forcibly displacing people who oppose Assad after years of bombardment and siege” (Al Jazeera, 1 April 2017). Reasons to stay in Waer included the need to protect property and concerns about adjusting to life in sites for IDPs. Reasons to leave, particularly for men aged 18 to 45 years, included avoiding being drafted into the Syrian army. Challenges and threats reported during the evacuation included overcrowding, long waiting periods and physical abuse (UNHCR, 26 April 2017).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Herat, Kandahar, Nangarhar and Nimroz provinces

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 8,900 returns from Iran between 23 and 29 April; about 5,700 returns from Pakistan between 23 and 29 April

Context

About 8,900 undocumented Afghans returned from Iran through Islam Qala border crossing in Herat province and Milak border crossing in Nimroz province between 23 and 29 April. This is a 45 per cent decrease on the previous week because of poor weather (high winds) and brings the total number of such returns in 2017 to 110,000. About 5,700 undocumented Afghans returned from Pakistan through Torkham border crossing in Nangarhar province and Spin Boldak border crossing in Kandahar province between 23 and 29 April. This is a 14 per cent increase on the previous week and brings the total number of such returns in 2017 to 45,000 (IOM, 29 April 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Affected areas

Kasaï Central province

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

78,000 new displacements between 14 and 22 April

Context

About 78,000 people were displaced in and around the areas of Kalombo, Kananga and Luiza in Kasaï Central province between 14 and 22 April following intercommunal clashes also involving militias and armed groups linked to the assassination of a local community leader. About 1.2 million people were displaced in Kasaï, Kasaï Central and Kasaï Oriental as of 27 April (OCHA, 27 April 2017). About 3.7 million people were displaced across the Democratic Republic of the Congo as of 27 April, up from 2.2 million one year earlier. Numbers rose steeply in the second half of 2016 (Reliefweb, 15 March 2017).

Horn of Africa

Affected areas

Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Drought)

Figures

More than 815,000 new displacements between 1 November 2016 and 21 April 2017

Context

More than 75,000 people were displaced directly or indirectly in relation to drought in Somalia between 1 and 21 April, of whom 18,000 people went to Mogadishu and 35,000 to Baidoa. This brings the total number of displacements associated with drought between November and 21 April to 615,000 (549,000 attributable to drought and 67,000 related to drought). (UNHCR, 21 April 2017). Extreme drought conditions were reported in parts of Awedal, Bari, Bay, Gedo, Nugaal, Sanaag, Sool, Togdheer and Wogooyi Galbeed regions (FAO 28 April 2017).

More than 200,000 people were displaced in Ethiopia between January and 13 April due to drought, most in the Somali region (IOM DTM Round 4 Summary, 10 March to 13 April, in IDMC files).

Pastoralists in the Horn of Africa can move several times in search of drinkable water for themselves or their animals. One group of nine families moved six times in six months. Across Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia and Somaliland, 10.7 million people face severe food shortages. There are increasing concerns the situation will get much worse as rainfall in March and early April was very low in places. Poor rainfall is forecast for April to June, the end of the rainy season (Oxfam, 21 April 2017).

Notes For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 10 (if the figure is less than 999), 100 (if the figure is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger).
The IDU gives priority to displacement flows that occurred or were reported in stated period. However, due to reliance on third party sources, certain entries may include information that refers to an earlier reporting period. For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.